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Artist > Caspar David Friedrich  (2 pages, 21 paintings.)

Caspar David Friedrich

Caspar David Friedrich (September 5, 1774 – May 7, 1840) was a 19th-century German Romantic landscape painter, generally considered the most important of the movement.[2] He is best known for his mid-period allegorical landscapes which typically feature contemplative figures silhouetted against night skies, morning mists, barren trees or Gothic ruins. His primary interest as an artist was the contemplation of nature, and his often symbolic and anti-classical work seeks to convey a subjective, emotional response to the natural world. Friedrich's work characteristically sets the human element in diminished perspective amid expansive landscapes, reducing the figures to a scale that, according to the art historian Christopher John Murray, directs "the viewer's gaze towards their metaphysical dimension".[3]

Friedrich was born in the Swedish Pomeranian town of Greifswald, where he began his studies in art as a youth. Later, he studied in Copenhagen until 1798, before settling in Dresden. He came of age during a period when, across Europe, a growing disillusionment with materialistic society was giving rise to a new appreciation of spirituality. This shift in ideals was often expressed through a reevaluation of the natural world, as artists such as Friedrich, J. M. W. Turner (1775–1851) and John Constable (1776-1837) sought to depict nature as a "divine creation, to be set against the artifice of human civilization".[4]

Friedrich’s work brought him renown early in his career, and contemporaries such as the French sculptor David d'Angers (1788–1856) spoke of him as a man who had discovered "the tragedy of landscape".[5] Nevertheless, his work fell from favour during his later years, and he died in obscurity, and in the words of the art historian Philip Miller, "half mad".[6] As Germany moved towards modernisation in the late 19th century, a new sense of urgency characterised its art, and Friedrich’s contemplative depictions of stillness came to be seen as the products of a bygone age. The early 20th century brought a renewed appreciation of his work, beginning in 1906 with an exhibition of thirty-two of his paintings and sculptures in Berlin. By the 1920s his paintings had been discovered by the Expressionists, and in the 1930s and early 1940s Surrealists and Existentialists frequently drew ideas from his work. The rise of Nazism in the early 1930s again saw a resurgence in Friedrich's popularity, but this was followed by a sharp decline as his paintings were, by association with the Nazi movement, misinterpreted as having a nationalistic aspect.[7] It was not until the late 1970s that Friedrich regained his reputation as an icon of the German Romantic movement and a painter of international importance.

Wreck in the Sea of Ice
ID:7493
Woman on the Beach of Rugen
ID:7492
Winter Landscape
ID:7491
Winter Landscape with Church
ID:7490
Village Landscape in Morning Light (The Lone Tree)
ID:7489
The Tree of Crows
ID:7488
The Ruins of Eldena
ID:7487
The Oaktree in the Snow
ID:7486
The Cross on the Mountain, Kunstmuseum at Dusseldorf
ID:7485
The Chasseur in the Forest
ID:7484
The Cemetery Gate (The Churchyard)
ID:7483
Rocky Ravine
ID:7482
Riesengebirge
ID:7481
Moon rising over Sea
ID:7480
Landscape with Solitary Tree
ID:7479
Landscape with Pavilion
ID:7478
Landscape with Oak Trees and a Hunter
ID:7477
Graveyard under Snow
ID:7476
Eldena Ruin
ID:7475
Chalk Cliffs on Rugen
ID:7474

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